LINGUIST List 32.3296

Wed Oct 20 2021

FYI: XPRAG Wine Gatherings

Editor for this issue: Everett Green <everettlinguistlist.org>



Date: 20-Oct-2021
From: Nicole Gotzner <nicole.gotznergooglemail.com>
Subject: XPRAG Wine Gatherings
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The next XPRAG Wine Gathering will bring back our old friend Dale Barr. On 21st October, he will give a talk titled ''On the weak explanatory power of belief reasoning in pragmatics: What next?''. We invite you to drink one maximally filled glass of Scotch or Irn-Bru with us. Once an XPRAG member, always an XPRAG member!

Date: 21st October, 8.15 p.m. (CET)
Speakers: Dale Barr (University of Glasgow)
Talk: On the weak explanatory power of belief reasoning in pragmatics: What next?
Hosts: Nicole Gotzner (University of Potsdam) and Ira Noveck (Université de Paris, CNRS)
Drink menu: one maximally filled glass of Scotch or Irn-Bru
Zoom link: https://u-paris.zoom.us/j/87650602862?pwd=MUFvWG1iTVFCNHJZei84cHBITDdndz09
Meeting ID: 876 5060 2862
Passcode: 202020
Website: https://sites.google.com/view/xprag-wine/home
YouTube: www.youtube.com/channel/UCRufcORQIM1yz4clsk6afLw

Abstract:
Psycholinguists have expended considerable effort investigating how people adapt comprehension and production processes to the informational needs of their particular interlocutors, with lively debates emerging over the extent to which observed adaptations reflect the use of ''common ground'' or simpler heuristics. But it seems increasingly likely that such partner-specificity (whether a strong or weak version) explains only a tiny share of the variance in pragmatic phenomena which, by and large, seem to be driven by partner-independent representations and processes. Explaining pragmatic phenomena through the lens of partner independence thus becomes an important but utterly neglected agenda. In this talk I will present psycholinguistic evidence that justifies this agenda, along with some preliminary ideas about the way forward.

Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science; Pragmatics; Psycholinguistics


Page Updated: 20-Oct-2021