LINGUIST List 32.2592

Sat Aug 07 2021

Calls: German; Applied Ling, Comp Ling, Lang Acquisition, Psycholing, Text/Corpus Ling/Tübingen, Germany

Editor for this issue: Everett Green <everettlinguistlist.org>



Date: 05-Aug-2021
From: Zarah Weiss <zweisssfs.uni-tuebingen.de>
Subject: Adaptive Linguistic Complexity: Readability, Developmentally Proximal Input, Alignment (DGFS 2022, AG 11)
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Full Title: Adaptive Linguistic Complexity: Readability, Developmentally Proximal Input, Alignment (DGFS 2022, AG 11)

Date: 23-Feb-2022 - 25-Feb-2022
Location: Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Germany
Contact Person: Zarah Weiss
Meeting Email: < click here to access email >
Web Site: https://dgfs.de/de/themen2/dgfs-2022-in-tuebingen.html

Linguistic Field(s): Applied Linguistics; Computational Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics; Text/Corpus Linguistics

Subject Language(s): German

Call Deadline: 01-Sep-2021

Meeting Description:

Aspects related to adaptive linguistic complexity are discussed in several different fields: Readability research investigates which texts can be read by which reader for which purpose, second language acquisition research aims to determine what constitutes developmentally proximal input effectively fostering acquisition for a given learner, research into spoken language classroom interaction asks whether teachers offer appropriately complex input for children to acquire academic language abilities (“Bildungssprache”), and dialog research studies alignment phenomena in which interlocutors linguistically adapt to each other’s language.

While the fields differ in their particular focus, the linguistic complexity of the language used – in the sense of the elaborateness and variedness of the linguistic means used to convey a given meaning in a given task – plays an important role in each of them. We therefore want to bring together researchers to discuss adaptive linguistic complexity in the different domains, how it can be measured and modeled, and how such models can be empirically validated. Where can linguistic insight help in systematically shaping language form for a given audience? What constitutes developmentally proximal input for second language acquisition, and where is this similar or different for academic language acquisition? For which domains of linguistic modeling can alignment processes be observed in dialogues – and is this the same process supporting acquisition in the zone of proximal development?

We believe that bringing together researchers from different (sub)fields around the theme of adaptive linguistic complexity can help establish a common conceptual and methodological basis needed to mutually benefit from the research insights published in the so-far separate literatures – and can also help highlight the relevance of linguistic analysis for a range of applied domain.

Call for Papers:

The presentation language at the workshop will be English. We encourage research on a broad range of languages and on written as well as spoken language. Topics of interest include (but are not limited to):

- How can (adaptive) linguistic complexity be measured and modeled (e.g., across languages, in spoken language, in authentic learning contexts) and how can such models be empirically validated?
- Where can linguistic insight help in systematically shaping language form for a given audience (for example but not limited to language learning contexts)?
- What constitutes developmentally proximal input for second (or first) language acquisition, and where is this similar or different for academic language acquisition (in the first or second language)?
- For which domains of linguistic modeling can alignment processes be observed in dialogues – and is this the same process supporting acquisition in the zone of proximal development?
- Which effects do tasks or register effects have on the assessment of (adaptive) linguistic complexity across different linguistic domains?

We also invite project descriptions and progress reports for research focused on or integrating complexity research into the assessment of language adaptivity.

Submissions should consist of an anonymized abstract of 1 page (plus unlimited references) using Times New Roman 12pt. Abstracts should be sent as PDFs to zweisssfs.uni-tuebingen.de no later than Sep 1, 2021 in an email listing the title of the abstract and authors. Notifications of acceptance will be sent out by Sep 15, 2021.




Page Updated: 07-Aug-2021