LINGUIST List 7.412

Wed Mar 20 1996

Confs: Conceptual Structure, Discourse, and Lang II

Editor for this issue: Ann Dizdar <dizdartam2000.tamu.edu>


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  1. Jean-Pierre A Koenig, CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURE, DISCOURSE, AND LANGUAGE II

Message 1: CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURE, DISCOURSE, AND LANGUAGE II

Date: Sat, 16 Mar 1996 12:28:18 EST
From: Jean-Pierre A Koenig <jpkoenigacsu.Buffalo.EDU>
Subject: CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURE, DISCOURSE, AND LANGUAGE II
 CONCEPTUAL STRUCTURE, DISCOURSE, AND LANGUAGE II

 April 12-14, 1996

 State University of New York at Buffalo


Sponsors: Department of Linguistics, Center for Cognitive Science,
 Conference in the Disciplines, Council on International Studies,
 Intensive English Language Institute, World Languages Institute.

Registration: Free for SUNY students, $15 for non-SUNY students, $25
 for others. Send cash or checks (payable to
 'SUNY-Buffalo/Linguistics') to: CSDL II, Linguistics Dept., 685
 Baldy Hall, SUNY at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14260.

Contact: jpkoenigacsu.buffalo.edu, (716) 645-2177, or visit our Web
 Site at :

 http://wings.buffalo.edu/soc-sci/linguistics/csdl2/CSDL2.html


FRIDAY, APRIL 12 (Center for tomorrow, Amherst Campus)

9:00-9:25 Turner, Mark. University of Maryland, College Park.
 'Blending and counterfactuals.'
9:25-9:50 Robert, Adrian. UC San Diego.
 'Blending and other conceptual operations in the
	interpretation of mathematical proofs.'
9:50-10:15 Grush, Rick. Washington University, St Louis.
 Mandelblit, Nili. UC San Diego.
 'Blending in language, conceptual structure, and the cerebral cortex.'
10:15-10:40 Fridman-Mintz, Boris. Universidad de Colima.
 Liddell, Scott. Gallaudet University.
 'Sequencing Mental Spaces in ASL narratives.'


INVITED SPEAKER:

10:55-11:35 Gentner, Dedre. Northwestern University.
 'Metaphor as mapping.'

11:35-12:00 Kellogg, Margaret. UC San Diego.
 'Bodies in action: active zones and verb expression by aphasic patients.'
12:00-12:25 Allen, Shanley and Heike Schroeder. Max Planck Institute.
 'Preferred argument structure in early Inuktitut spontaneous
 speech data.'
12:25-12:50 Harris, Catherine. Boston University.
 'Psycholinguistic studies of entrenchment.'


 LUNCH BREAK


INVITED SPEAKER:
2:20-3:00 Dubois, John. UC Santa Barbara.
 'Dialogic Syntax.'


3:00-3:25 Fraczak, Lidia. University of Paris-Sud.
 'A two-level approach to discourse analysis.'
3:25-3:50 Mushin, Ilana. SUNY at Buffalo.
 'Perspective shifts in narrative discourse.'
3:50-4:15 Irandoust, Hengameh. University of Paris-Orsay.
 'Perspective and temporal structure of narrative texts.'

4:30-4:55 Michaelis, Laura. University of Colorado.
 Lambrecht, Knud. University of Texas at Austin.
 'On sentence accent in information questions.'
4:55-5:20 Matthewson, Lisa. University of British Columbia.
 'Salish determiners: evidence for a discourse parameter.'
5:20-5:55 Schilperoord, Joost and Arie Verhagen. Utrecht University.
 'Sense dependency in clausal configurations in discourse.'

EVENING SPEAKERS:
8:00-8:40 Fauconnier, Gilles. UC San Diego.
 'Principles of Conceptual Integration'
8:40-9:20 Talmy, Leonard. SUNY at Buffalo.
 'Attention and Focus'



SATURDAY, APRIL 13 (114 Wende Hall, Main campus)

9:00-9:25 Strausfeld, Laura. UC Berkeley.
 'Speech acts and truth models: metaphor analysis in discourse
 pragmatics.' 
9:25-9:50 Grady, Joseph. UC Berkeley.
 'A reassessment of metaphors for mental processes.'
9:50-10:15 Cienki, Alan. Emory University.
 'Metaphoric gestures and their relations to
	verbal metaphorical expressions'
10:15-10:40 Taub, Sarah. UC Berkeley.
 'The connection between grammaticalization and event structure
 metaphor: evidence from Uighur auxiliation.'

INVITED SPEAKER:
10:55-11:35 Schiffrin, Deborah. Georgetown University.
 'The interactive construction of space in discourse.'

11:35-12:00 Hirst, Graeme. University of Toronto.
 'The conceptual differentiation of near-synonyms.'
12:00-12:25 Barnden, John, Stephen Helmreich, and Gees Stein.
 New Mexico State University.
 'An AI system for metaphorical reasoning about mental
 states in discourse.'
12:25-12:50 Narayanan, Srini. International Computer Science
 Institute and UC Berkeley.
 'A cognitive model of aspect.'

 LUNCH BREAK

2:20-2:45 Fong, Vivienne, and Christine Poulin. Stanford University.
 'Locating linguistic variation in semantic templates.'
2:45-3:10 Goldberg, Adele. UC San Diego.
 'Lexical items and principles of predication.'
3:10-3:35 Kirsner, Robert. UCLA.
 van der Kloot, Wim. Rijksuniversiteit Leiden.
 'Right in the middle of it: the discourse pragmatics of geometric 
	versus non-geometric periphrastic progressives in English.'

3:45-4:10 Polinsky, Maria. Univeristy of Southern California.
 'Double object constructions: a cognitive account.'
4:10-4:35 Croft, William. University of Manchester.
 'Locative subjects and related constructions.'
4:35-5:00 Byrne, William. UC San Diego.
 'Lexical semantics vs. pragmatics and the distribution of
 generic objects.'

EVENING SPEAKERS:
5:15-5:55 Langacker, Ronald. UC San Diego.
 'On Subjectification and Grammaticization.'
5:55-6:35 Lakoff, George. UC Berkeley.
 'The metaphorical structure of mathematics:
 a research program for cognitive science.'

CONFERENCE PARTY: 7:30-11:00 Charter Oaks community house


SUNDAY, APRIL 14 (109 Knox Hall, Amherst campus)

9:00-9:25 Schwenter, Scott. Stanford University.
 'From hypothetical to factual and beyond: independent 'si'-
 clauses in Spanish conversation.'
9:25-9:50 Israel, Michael. UC San Diego.
 'Until 2.'
9:50-10:15 Sweetser, Eve. UC Berkeley.
 'Evocative protases and discourse function.'
10:15-10:40 Koenig, Jean-Pierre and Beate Benndorf. SUNY at Buffalo.
 'Meaning and context: German aber and sondern.'

INVITED SPEAKER:
10:55-11:35 Bowermann, Melissa. Max-Planck Institute.
		'Shaping meanings to language: Universal and language
		specific in the acquisition of semantic categories.'

11:35-12:00 Cumming, Susanna and Tsuyoshi Ono. UC Santa Barbara.
 'Categories and terms: a re-examination of the basic level in 
	discourse.'
12:00-12:25 Emanatian, Michele. University of Massachusetts.
 'Intellectual and conversational paths.'
12:25-12:50 Farrell, Patrick. UC Davis.
 'The conceptual basis of number marking in Brazilian Portuguese.'

 LUNCH BREAK

2:20-2:45 Fong, Vivienne. Stanford University.
 'Place and time as semantic primitives for directional locatives.'
2:45-3:10 Braun, Friederike. Kiel University.
 'Prototype theory and covert gender in Turkish.'
3:10-3:35 Achard, Michel. University of Florida.
 'Stucture and grammatical coding of a conceptual category:
 the complements of perception verbs in French.'
3:35-4:00 Van Hoek, Karen. University of Michigan.
 'Negative polarity 'any': a Mental Space account.'

4:10-4:35 Carey, Kathleen. University of North Texas.
 'A historical approach to the English reflexive.'
4:35-5:00 Ariel, Mira. Tel-Aviv University.
 'The grammaticalization of person agreement:
 an accessibility versus a markedness account.'
5:00-5:25 Dorgeloh, Heidrun. University of Duesseldorf.
 'Marked syntax and the relevance of discourse type
 and structure.'
5:25-5:50 Huumo, Tuomas. University of Turku.
 'Bound spaces and the semantic interpretation of existentials.'


ALTERNATES
Dancygier, Barbara:
 'How Polish structures space: prepositions,
	direction nouns, case, and metaphor'
Hinkson, Mercedes, Simon Fraser University:
 'The Salish lexical suffixes for 'belly":
	a case study in grammaticalization'
Raymond, William, and Kristing Homer, University of Colorado:
 'The interaction of participant role and pragmatic function
 in constituent question constructions'
Rhee, Seongha, University of Texas at Austin:
 'The grammaticalization of serial verbs of displacement in Korean'
Zhou, Minglang, University of Oregon:
 'Function of temporal adverbials in discourse'





 TRANSPORTATION: HOW TO GET TO THE
	AMHERST AND MAIN CAMPUSES

 The CSDL-II conference will take place on the Amherst (or North)
Campus of SUNY Buffalo on Friday, April 12 1996, and Sunday, April
14,1996. The conference will take place on the Main (or South) Campus
of SUNY Buffalo onSaturday, April 13, 1996. The Amherst Campus is
situated north of I-290, near the intersection of Route 263
(Millersport Highway) and Maple Road. The South Campus is located
within Buffalo itself, at the corner of Main Street (Route 5) and
Bailey Avenue. See enclosed maps for location on campus of the
buildings where CSDL-II talks will take place.


 If you fly into Buffalo:

 Taxi service is available from the airport to the hotels near the
Amherst Campus. The fare is approximately $15.00.

 If you fly into Toronto:

 Direct transportation to the Amherst or Main Campus or to the hotels
near the Amherst campus from Toronto International Airport is
available via Niagara Air Bus. The rates cited here are in US
dollars. The individual rate is $35 one way, or $70 round trip. The
fee rates per group for groups with exclusive use of vehicle are: for
groups of 4 people $135 one-way, $270 round trip; for groups of 10
people - $200 one-way, $400 round trip. Arrangements should be made
several days in advance through Glenny Travel (toll
free:800-667-488. Or 716-853-3572).

 If you come by rail:

 Local bus/MetroRail service is available from the downtown
train station. From the train station, walk about a block and a half
west along Exchange St. to Main St. Take the MetroRail to the UB Main
or South Campus. To get from the Main Campus to the Amherst Campus
take a #44A bus to the Flint Loop on the Amherst Campus. From the
Depew Station, you would have to take a taxi, which would cost $15-$20
to the UB Amherst or Main campus or to the hotels near the Amherst
Campus. Taxi service is also available from the downtown station but
would cost somewhat more.

 If you come by bus:

 Same as if you come by rail to the downtown train station, except
that you walk about 2 blocks west to Main St. to get the MetroRail.


 If you come by car:

 The Amherst Campus is just off Millersport Highway (Route 263),
north of Maple Rd. If you are arriving via the New York Thruway,
either from the east or from the west, take exit 50, I-290 (Youngmann
Memorial Highway) to the Millersport Highway North (Route 263).
Proceed north to the State University Exit (SUNYAB-Flint Entrance).
If you arriving from Canada, either from the Peace Bridge or from one
the more northern bridges, take I-190 to I-290. Proceed on I-290 to
I-990. Go north a short distance on I-990 to State University
exit. See map enclosed. If you wish to park on campus, you will need
a parking tag to do so; if you want a tag, please let us know and we
will send you one. You should know that parking on campus is rather
tight, particularly on Friday from 8:45 to 2:30.


 The Main Campus is at the corner of Bailey Ave. and Main Street
(Route 5). If you are arriving via the New York Thruway, either from
the east or from the west, take exit 50, I-290 (Youngmann Memorial
Highway) to the Main Street West exit. Proceed West on Main for about
4 miles to the corner of Main and Bailey. If you are arriving from
Canada, either from the Peace Bridge or from one the more northern
bridges, take I-190 to I-290. Proceed as follows then. See map
enclosed. If you wish to park on campus, you will need a parking tag
to do so; if you want a tag, please let us know and we will send you
one. You should know that parking on campus is rather tight,
particularly on Friday from 8:45 to 2:30.


 ACCOMMODATIONS

 The hotels and motels listed here are located next to the Amherst
campus, where the conference will be held, but require at least a
half-mile walk to get onto campus. The last one listed, Motel 6, is a
little further away, about a mile from the center of campus. A campus
shuttle stops at the Center for Tomorrow, which is not far from the
closer hotels; it can take you near the buildings where CSDL-II is
taking place. It runs Monday to Friday, from 7:45 to 5:45, every 10 or
15 minutes. In addition, we will provide a special CSDL-II shuttle
service between the hotels and the buildings where the meeting takes
place. We will leave information about this shuttle at each of the
hotels and motels. All of the 800 numbers cited below are supposed to
work from Canada as well as the U.S. For the first four motels and
inns, ASK FOR THE SPECIAL CSDL (or Conceptual Structure, Discourse,
and Language) rate.



 1) Red Roof Inn, I-190 and Millersport Hwy., Amherst, NY 14221
 (716) 689-7474 and (800) 843-7663.
 Fax: (716) 689-2051
 Special rates: Double: $49.99 + tax. King: 59.99 + tax.

 2) Super 8 Motel, 1 Flint Rd., Amherst, NY 14226
 (716) 688-0811 or (800) 800-8000
 Fax: (716) 688.23.65
 Special rates: Single: $44.00 + tax. Double: $52.10. Triple:
58.40 + tax.

 3) Marriott Inn, 1340 Millersport Hwy., Amherst, NY 14221.
 (716) 689-6900 or (800) 334-4040
 Fax: (716) 689-0483
 Special rate: Single or Double: $79.00 + tax. The price includes
free transportation to and from the airport, and use of an indoor
pool, hottub sauna, and workout room.

 4) Hampton Inn, 10 Flint Rd., Amherst, NY 14226
 (716) 689-4414 or (800) 426-7866
 Fax: (716) 689-4382
 Single: $59.00 + tax. Double: $63.00 + tax. The price includes:
 continental breakfast, free transportation to and from the
airport, and use of an indoor pool, jacuzzi, and fitness center.

 The following is somewhat farther from campus than the four listed
above:

 5) Motel 6, 4400 Maple Rd., Amherst, NY 14226
 (716) 834-2231 or (505) 891-6161
 Single: $35.99 + tax. Double: $41.99 + tax. Triple: $44.99 + tax.
 Quadruple: $47.99 + tax.
 Fax: (716) 834-0872

 Some "crash space" may be available for students. If you are
 interested, please let us know well ahead of time.

 CSDL-II

 REGISTRATION FORM

 Please return by April 5 to:
CSDL-II, Dept. of Linguistics, 685 Baldy Hall, SUNY,
Buffalo, NY, USA 14260.

 Make checks payable to "SUNY-Buffalo/Linguistics".

 Registration fees: _____ $25 (regular)

 _____ $15 (student)

 _____ SUNY student

 By SUNY regulations, registration is free for all SUNY students.


 Name: ____________________________________


 Address: ____________________________________

 ____________________________________

 ____________________________________

 ____________________________________


 Phone: ____________________________________


 Email: ____________________________________

 Affiliation: ____________________________________
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