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Title: The Middle Korean Translation of the Thay-San-Cip-Yo
Subtitle: A lexicologic study of Middle Korean equivalents for Chinese characters of the Thay-San-Cip-Yo
Written By: Yeong-Seop Park

This book focuses on two types of Middle Korean words, i.e. native Korean
words and Sino-Korean words.

The original text of this book is the Middle Korean translation of the
Thay-San-Cip-Yo (胎産集要), which was a medical book in the Joseon Dynasty.
Dr. Yeong-Seop Park claims that medical books of those days provide
linguists with materials important to a research of the Middle Korean
language. This is based on the historical fact that in the Joseon Dynasty
medical books written in classical Chinese were translated into one of the
simplest words in order to teach even ordinary people medical knowledge.
Moreover, this book selects the following texts as supplementary research
materials: (1) an anthology Twu-Si-En-Hay (杜詩諺解) 'the Middle Korean
translation of Po Twu (杜甫)’s poetry', (2) three Buddhist scriptures
'Sek-Po-Sang-Cel (釋譜詳節)', 'the Middle Korean translation of the
Nung-Em-Kyeng (楞嚴經)', and 'the Middle Korean translation of the
Nam-Myeng-Chen-Kyey-Song (南明泉繼頌)', (3) three handbooks of Chinese
characters for children, i.e. 'Hwun-Mong-Ca-Hoy (訓蒙字會)', 'Yu-Hap (類
合)', and 'Chen-Ca-Mwun (千字文)'.

This book makes a comparative analysis on Middle Korean equivalents for
Chinese characters of the main text, i.e. 'the Middle Korean translation of
the Thaysancipyo', and the other texts. This analysis shows the following
two results. One is how one Chinese character is translated into multiple
Middle Korean native words according to contexts. The other is the
phenomenon of disappearance of Middle Korean words. This phenomenon rose
from the competitive relationship between/among synonymous Middle Korean
native words or between/among synonymous Middle Korean native words and
Middle Sino-Korean words.

Publication Year: 2006
Publisher: Pagijong Press
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BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
Subject Language(s): Korean, Middle
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Format: Hardback
ISBN: 8978788769
ISBN-13: N/A
Pages: 278
Prices: S. Korean won 15,000.00