Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login

New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

On the Offensive

By Karen Stollznow

On the Offensive " This book sheds light on the derogatory phrases, insults, slurs, stereotypes, tropes and more that make up linguistic discrimination. Each chapter addresses a different area of prejudice: race and ethnicity; gender identity; sexuality; religion; health and disability; physical appearance; and age."


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

The Oxford Handbook of Languages of the Caucasus

By Maria Polinsky

The Oxford Handbook of Languages of the Caucasus "an introduction to and overview of the linguistically diverse languages of southern Russia, Georgia, Azerbaijan, and Armenia. Though the languages of the Caucasus have often been mischaracterized or exoticized, many of them have cross-linguistically rare features found in few or no other languages."



E-mail this page 1

We Have a New Site!

With the help of your donations we have been making good progress on designing and launching our new website! Check it out at https://linguistlist.org/!
***We are still in our beta stages for the new site--if you have any feedback, be sure to let us know at webdevlinguistlist.org***

Dissertation Information


Title: A Typology of Verbal Borrowing Add Dissertation
Author: Jan Wohlgemuth Update Dissertation
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://email.eva.mpg.de/~wohlgemu
Institution: Universität Leipzig, Institut für Linguistik
Completed in: 2008
Linguistic Subfield(s): Historical Linguistics; Morphology; Sociolinguistics; Typology;
Director(s): Balthasar Bickel
Martin Haspelmath
Thomas Stolz

Abstract: The questions as to why most languages appear to have more trouble
borrowing verbs than nouns, and as to the possible mechanisms and paths by
which verbs can be borrowed or the obstacles for verb borrowing, have been
a topic of interest since the late 19th century. However, no truly
substantial typological research had been undertaken in this field before
the present study.

The present work is the first in-depth cross-linguistic study on loan verbs
and the morphological, syntactic and sociolinguistic aspects of loan verb
accommodation. It applies current methodologies on database management,
quantitative analysis and typological conventions and it is based on a
broad global sample of data from over 400 languages and the typological
data from the World Atlas of Language Structures (WALS).

One major result of the present study is the falsification, on empirical
grounds, of long-standing claims that verbs generally are more difficult to
borrow than other parts of speech, or that verbs could never be borrowed as
verbs and always needed a re-verbalization in the borrowing language.