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Voice Quality

By John H. Esling, Scott R. Moisik, Allison Benner, Lise Crevier-Buchman

Voice Quality "The first description of voice quality production in forty years, this book provides a new framework for its study: The Laryngeal Articulator Model. Informed by instrumental examinations of the laryngeal articulatory mechanism, it revises our understanding of articulatory postures to explain the actions, vibrations and resonances generated in the epilarynx and pharynx."


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Let's Talk

By David Crystal

Let's Talk "Explores the factors that motivate so many different kinds of talk and reveals the rules we use unconsciously, even in the most routine exchanges of everyday conversation."



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Dissertation Information


Title: The Phase Model and Adverbials Add Dissertation
Author: Petr Biskup Update Dissertation
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.uni-leipzig.de/~biskup/
Institution: Universität Leipzig, Postgraduate programme in linguistics 'Universalität und Diversität'
Completed in: 2009
Linguistic Subfield(s): Syntax;
Director(s): Uwe Junghanns
Gereon Müller
Klaus Abels

Abstract: This dissertation addresses two issues, phases and adverbials. The general
proposal is that there is a correlation between the phase structure, the
tripartite quantificational structure and the information structure of the
sentence. At the semantic interface, the vP phase is interpreted as the
nuclear scope of the quantificational structure and the information-focus
domain of the information structure and the CP phase is interpreted as the
restrictive clause of the quantificational structure and the background domain.

This correlation plays an important role not only in referential and
information-structural properties of arguments and the verb but also in
adverbial properties. It is argued that adverbials generally can be merged
in the vP phase and that under the right circumstances they can occur in
the sentence-final position. It is shown e.g. that certain sentence
adverbials can occur in the sentence-final position in the vP phase when
they represent the extreme value with respect to the set of focus
alternatives.

The proposed correlation also plays an important role in anaphoric
relations with respect to adjuncts. Only a backgrounded r-expression in an
adjunct clause can corefer with the coindexed pronoun in a clause distinct
from the adjunct clause, that is, an r-expression that is sufficiently
distant from the coindexed pronoun in the structure and that is spelled out
and interpreted in the CP phase of the adjunct clause.

It is also shown that the phase structure is an important factor in
adverbial ordering. It is argued that relative orders of adverbials
expressing an interval are determined by the natural evolution of
spatiotemporal domains - namely, by the Principle of Natural Evolution of
Intervals - and that this principle is restricted to phase domains. Thus,
the relative order of adverbials expressing an interval can be reversed if
they occur in different phases.