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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."



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Dissertation Information


Title: On-Stage Calls: An ethnolinguistic analysis of spoken language in professional flamenco performance Add Dissertation
Author: Mariana Maduell Update Dissertation
Email: click here to access email
Institution: University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Linguistics
Completed in: 1994
Linguistic Subfield(s): Discourse Analysis;
Subject Language(s): Spanish
Director(s): Michael Forman
George Grace

Abstract: This dissertation describes jaleo and cues, two genres of calls that
occur on stage during professional flamenco performance. It is based
on performance data collected over the last nine years, especially 1985
through 1988, plus additional material from earlier periods.

Chapters one through three provide general background. Chapter one
introduces the idea of taking frameworks usually used in the analysis of
performance situations in which language use is the most important
aspect of the situation and applying them to situations in which
language use is only one of many aspects of the performance, and
indeed not the focus of the performance, which is the case for on-stage
calls in flamenco. It also details certain words and concepts as they will
be used in the dissertation.

Chapter two presents a brief survey of relevant literature. Chapter
three provides background information on flamenco, its performance,
and its performance speech genres: cante, jaleo, and cues.

Chapters four through six discuss three separate levels of analysis for
jaleo and cues: characteristics of the calls themselves, the calls in the
context of performance, and considerations with respect to verbal art.

Chapter seven concludes the study by presenting my findings for the
three levels of analysis attempted, reinforcing my claim that existing
methods can be applied profitably to examine this type of language
use. Ideas are offered for further research of both other flamenco
linguistic situations and of similar linguistic phenomena in other
cultures.

Appendices of flamenco terminology and videography are also
provided.