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It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

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Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: Bracketing Paradox in Russian
Author: Alicia Rose Trosky
Email: click here TO access email
Linguistic Field: Morphology
Subject Language: Russian
Abstract: I'm looking to find some sort of summary of bracketing paradoxes as they are in russian verbs. I am only a second year lingustics student and attempting to read Pesetsky's Russian Morphology paper has proved fruitless out of my own limitations, especially in the field of phonology. If there is any one who can set out in as few and simple words as possible this paradox for me, I would appreciate it. I would specifically like to know 1)what exactly the yers do to verbs and 2) why the prefix seems to be added last rather than added first and then the unit is inflected . I appreciate any help you may offer. My email address is
Type: Individual Paper
Status: In Progress
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