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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


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Academic Paper


Title: The role of home literacy and language environment on bilinguals' English and Spanish vocabulary development
Author: Elisabeth Duursma
Institution: Harvard Graduate School of Education
Author: Silvia Romero-Contreras
Institution: Harvard Graduate School of Education
Author: Anna Szuber
Institution: Harvard Graduate School of Education
Author: Patrick Proctor
Institution: Harvard Graduate School of Education
Author: Catherine E Snow
Institution: Harvard University
Author: Diane August
Institution: Center for Applied Linguistics
Author: Margarita Calderón
Institution: Center for Research on the Education of Students Placed At Risk
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: English
Spanish
Abstract: For the monolingual population, research has shown that vocabulary knowledge is closely related to reading achievement. However, the role of vocabulary has not been studied as extensively in the bilingual population. It is important to look at vocabulary to better understand reading achievement in the bilingual population in the United States. This study investigated the predictors of Spanish and English vocabulary for 96 fifth-grade Latino English language learners. Our results suggest that becoming or staying proficient in English did not require parental use of English in the home. However, proficiency in Spanish required both instructional support at school and social support at home; it is likely that the low social status of Spanish is related to its greater dependence on home support.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 28, Issue 1.

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