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May I Quote You on That?

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A guide to English grammar and usage for the twenty-first century, pairing grammar rules with interesting and humorous quotations from American popular culture.

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Academic Paper

Title: The orthographic consistency effect in the recognition of French spoken words: An early developmental shift from sublexical to lexical orthographic activation
Author: Chotiga Pattamadilok
Institution: Université Libre de Bruxelles, Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique
Author: José Morais
Institution: Université Libre de Bruxelles
Author: Olivia De Vylder
Institution: Université Libre de Bruxelles
Author: Paulo Ventura
Institution: Universidade de Lisboa
Author: Régine Kolinsky
Institution: Université Libre de Bruxelles, Fonds de la Recherche Scientifique
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: French
Abstract: The generality of the orthographic consistency effect in speech recognition tasks previously reported for Portuguese beginning readers was assessed in French-speaking children, as the French orthographic code presents a higher degree of inconsistency than the Portuguese one. Although the findings obtained with the French second graders replicated the generalized consistency effect (both for words and pseudowords, in both lexical decision and shadowing) displayed by the Portuguese second to fourth graders, the data obtained with the French third and fourth graders resembled the adult pattern, with the orthographic effect restricted to lexical decision. This suggests that, in the course of literacy acquisition, the overall orthographic inconsistency of the language's orthographic code influences the rate at which orthographic representations will impact on spoken word recognition.


This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 30, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .

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