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Academic Paper


Title: The acoustic character of fricated /t/ in Australian English: A comparison with /s/ and /ʃ/
Author: Mark Jonathan Jones
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Cambridge
Author: Kirsty McDougall
Institution: University of Cambridge
Linguistic Field: Phonology
Abstract: Australian English /t/ has a fricative realisation in some contexts. The presence of an additional surface fricative in the language raises questions about potential merger and the maintenance of contrasts. An orthographic representation of fricated /t/ as (sh) suggests a similarity to the existing fricative /ʃ/. This paper compares the acoustic characteristics of fricated realisations of /t/ in Australian English with those of /ʃ/ and //, the fricatives judged most likely to be acoustically similar. The findings suggest a great degree of similarity to /ʃ/ in terms of spectral measures, with duration being the most likely perceptual means of distinguishing fricated /t/ from /ʃ/.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of the International Phonetic Association Vol. 39, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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