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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: Predictors of early precocious talking: A prospective population study
Author: Jemma Skeat
Institution: University of Melbourne
Author: Melissa Wake
Institution: University of Melbourne
Author: Sheena Reilly
Institution: Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital
Author: Patricia Eadie
Institution: Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, The Royal Children's Hospital
Author: Lesley Bretherton
Institution: University of Melbourne
Author: Edith L. Bavin
Institution: La Trobe University
Author: O. C. Ukoumunne
Institution: University of Melbourne
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: This study examines potential predictors of ‘precocious talking’ (expressive language ≥90th percentile) at one and two years of age, and of ‘stability’ in precocious talking across both time periods, drawing on data from a prospective community cohort comprising over 1,800 children. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationship between precocious talking and the following potential predictors: gender, birth order, birth weight, non-English speaking background, socioeconomic status, maternal age, maternal mental health scores, and vocabulary and educational attainment of parents. The strongest predictors of precocity (being female and having a younger mother) warrant further exploration. Overall, however, it appears that precocity in early vocabulary development is not strongly influenced by the variables examined, which together explained just 2·6% and 1% of the variation at 1 ; 0 and 2 ; 0 respectively.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 37, Issue 5, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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