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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: Evolution of the missing-letter effect among young readers between ages 5 and 8
Author: Denis Foucambert
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Université du Québec à Montréal
Author: Jacques Baillé
Institution: Université Pierre Mendès France
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: French
Abstract: In light of the numerous studies on the detection of target letters among adults, it is generally accepted that the missing-letter effect depends both on a given word's frequency in its language and on its role (function vs. content) in a sentence. Following a presentation of several models explaining these observations we analyze the results of a letter-detection task given to 886 French students from kindergarten to second grade. The purpose of the present study is to determine the moment when the sensitivity to content/function word distinction emerges. The results of this study reveal that even if word frequency plays a role in letter detection, the emergence of an ability to extract sentence structure, along the lines of the structural model of reading, is significantly linked to the initial stages of explicit reading instruction.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 32, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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