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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

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Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


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Academic Paper


Title: Phonological memory, attention control, and musical ability: Effects of individual differences on rater judgments of second language speech
Author: Talia Isaacs
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.taliaisaacs.com
Institution: University College London
Author: Pavel Trofimovich
Institution: Concordia University
Linguistic Field: Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: This study examines how listener judgments of second language speech relate to individual differences in listeners’ phonological memory, attention control, and musical ability. Sixty native English listeners (30 music majors, 30 nonmusic majors) rated 40 nonnative speech samples for accentedness, comprehensibility, and fluency. The listeners were also assessed for phonological memory (serial recognition), attention control (trail making), and musical aptitude. Results showed that music majors assigned significantly lower scores than nonmusic majors solely for accentedness, particularly for low ability second language speakers. However, the ratings were not significantly affected by individual differences in listeners’ phonological memory and attention control, which implies that these factors do not bias listeners’ subjective judgments of speech. Implications for psycholinguistic research and for high-stakes speaking assessments are discussed.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 32, Issue 1.

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