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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


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Academic Paper


Title: Revisiting CEWIGs: A reflection on the usage of collocations of 'English' with 'world', 'international' and 'global'
Author: Matthew Watterson
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Discourse Analysis; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: As regular readers of English Today would probably be aware, in the early years of the 21st Century, when applied linguists discuss the world-wide significance of the most widely learned and used language, it is not always enough to simply refer to it as 'English' or 'the English language'. On the contrary, it has become almost de rigueur to collocate the word 'English' with 'world', 'international' or 'global'. Thus, we have the six commonly used expressions set out in Table 1. At the risk of adding further to the crowded landscape of abbreviations in applied linguistics, I will refer to these as 'CEWIGs' (Collocations of 'English' with 'world', 'international' and 'global').

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN English Today Vol. 27, Issue 1.

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