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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: Attitudinal and sociostructural factors and their role in dialect change: Testing a model of subjective factors
Author: Louise Kammacher
Institution: University of Copenhagen
Author: Andreas Stöhr
Institution: University of Copenhagen
Author: J. Normann Jørgensen
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Copenhagen
Linguistic Field: Phonology; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Danish
Abstract: The causation of language change is a problem with a high profile in sociolinguistics. This paper presents two contrasting models of language change: one that is based on sociopsychological factors (Kristiansen & Jørgensen, 2005) and one that rejects them (the Napoleon Principle, Brink & Lund, 1979). In a longitudinal study of individuals' changing pronunciation of the Danish -diphthong over 20 years, we test predictions following from the sociopsychologically oriented model. By the mid-1980s, female speakers used more aj-pronunciations that are associated with high socioeconomic status than did male speakers. However, in guise tests, females revealed a more positive attitude toward speech associated with low socioeconomic status. Our prediction that female speakers would change their speech patterns to include more aj-pronunciations associated with low socioeconomic status is supported by an analysis of the same female speakers' pronunciations as recorded in the mid-2000s.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language Variation and Change Vol. 23, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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