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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: Word frequency modulates morpheme-based reading in poor and skilled Italian readers
Author: Stefania Marcolini
Institution: Università degli Studi di Verona
Author: Daniela Traficante
Institution: Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore
Author: Pierluigi Zoccolotti
Institution: Università degli Studi di Roma - La Sapienza
Author: Cristina Burani
Institution: Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione (ISTC)
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: Italian
Abstract: A previous study reported that, similar to young and adult skilled readers, Italian developmental dyslexics read pseudowords made up of a root and a derivational suffix faster and more accurately than simple pseudowords. Unlike skilled readers, only dyslexic and reading-matched younger children benefited from morphological structure in reading words aloud. In this study, we show that word frequency affects the probability of morpheme-based reading, interacting with reading ability. Young skilled readers named low- but not high-frequency morphologically complex words faster than simple words. By contrast, the advantage for morphologically complex words was present in poor readers irrespective of word frequency. Adult readers showed no facilitating effect of morphological structure. These results indicate that young readers use reading units (morphemes) that are larger than the single-grapheme grain size. It is argued that morpheme-based reading is important for obtaining reading fluency (rather than accuracy) in transparent orthographies and is useful particularly in children with limited reading ability who do not fully master whole-word processing.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 32, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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