Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login

New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


We Have a New Site!

With the help of your donations we have been making good progress on designing and launching our new website! Check it out at https://linguistlist.org/!
***We are still in our beta stages for the new site--if you have any feedback, be sure to let us know at webdevlinguistlist.org***

Academic Paper


Title: An event-related potential study of the concreteness effect between Chinese nouns and verbs
Paper URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6SYR-4TXF818-1/2/49d0593b0157e317045f7795d955bc2b
Author: Pei-Shu Tsai
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: National Yang-Ming University
Author: Brenda H.-Y. Yu
Institution: (personal interest - not currently working at a university)
Author: Chia-Ying Lee
Institution: Academia Sinica
Linguistic Field: Cognitive Science; Neurolinguistics
Subject Language: Chinese, Mandarin
Abstract: The effect of concreteness has been heavily studied on nouns. However, there are scant reports on the effect for verbs. The present research independently manipulated concreteness and word class of Chinese disyllabic words in tasks that required different depths of semantic processing: a lexical decision task and a semantic relatedness judgment task. The results replicated the concreteness effect for nouns, indicating that concrete nouns elicited larger N400 responses than abstract nouns with a broad distribution over the scalp, irrespective of the task demands. Similar to the findings from English unambiguous verbs, the concreteness effect for Chinese verbs was also robustly observed from fontal to posterior electrodes in both tasks. These results suggest that when Chinese nouns and verbs are typical and unambiguous in both meanings and word classes, the similar topographic distributions of the N400 components reflect the same underlying cause(s) of the concreteness effect for these two word classes.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Brain Research, Volume 1253, 9 February, 2009, Pages 149-160
URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6SYR-4TXF818-1/2/49d0593b0157e317045f7795d955bc2b
Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page