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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


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Academic Paper


Title: Prosodic abilities in Spanish and English children with Williams syndrome: A cross-linguistic study
Author: Pastora Martínez-Castilla
Institution: Universidad Nacional de Educación a Distancia
Author: Vesna Stojanovik
Institution: University of Reading
Author: Jane E. Setter
Institution: University of Reading
Author: María Sotillo
Institution: Universidad Autónoma de Madrid
Linguistic Field: Phonology; Psycholinguistics; Typology
Subject Language: English
Spanish
Abstract: The aim of this study was to compare the prosodic profiles of English- and Spanish-speaking children with Williams syndrome (WS), examining cross-linguistic differences. Two groups of children with WS, English and Spanish, of similar chronological and nonverbal mental age, were compared on performance in expressive and receptive prosodic tasks from the Profiling Elements of Prosody in Speech–Communication Battery in its English or Spanish version. Differences between the English and Spanish WS groups were found regarding the understanding of affect through prosodic means, using prosody to make words more prominent, and imitating different prosodic patterns. Such differences between the two WS groups on function prosody tasks mirrored the cross-linguistic differences already reported in typically developing children.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 33, Issue 1.

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