Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login

New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


We Have a New Site!

With the help of your donations we have been making good progress on designing and launching our new website! Check it out at https://linguistlist.org/!
***We are still in our beta stages for the new site--if you have any feedback, be sure to let us know at webdevlinguistlist.org***

Academic Paper


Title: Prosody signals the emergence of intentional communication in the first year of life: evidence from Catalan-babbling infants
Author: Núria Esteve-Gibert
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Author: Pilar Prieto
Institution: Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats, Universitat Pompeu Fabra
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Phonetics; Pragmatics
Subject Language: Catalan-Valencian-Balear
Abstract: There is considerable debate about whether early vocalizations mimic the target language and whether prosody signals emergent intentional communication. A longitudinal corpus of four Catalan-babbling infants was analyzed to investigate whether children use different prosodic patterns to distinguish communicative from investigative vocalizations and to express intentionality. A total of 2,701 vocalizations from 0;7 to 0;11 were coded acoustically (by marking pitch range and duration), gesturally, and pragmatically (by marking communicative status and specific pragmatic function). The results showed that communicative vocalizations were shorter and had a wider pitch range than investigative vocalizations and that these patterns in communicative vocalizations depended on the intention of the vocalizations: requests and expressions of discontent displayed wider pitch range and longer duration than responses or statements. These results support the hypothesis that babbling children can successfully use a set of prosodic patterns to signal intentional speech.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 40, Issue 5.

Return to TOC.

Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page