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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

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Academic Paper


Title: Attention when?: An Investigation of the Ordering Effect of Input and Interaction
Author: Susan M. Gass
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: https://www.msu.edu/~gass/
Institution: Michigan State University, USA
Author: María José Alvarez Torres
Institution: Michigan State University
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition
Subject Language: Spanish
Abstract: This paper investigates the effects of input and interaction as separate entities and in combination. We further investigate these effects as a function of different language areas. One hundred two learners of L2 Spanish were provided with input on (a) Spanish gender agreement (noun + adjective), (b) estar + location, and (c) seven vocabulary items. There were four conditions: (a) material focused solely on input, (b) material focused solely on interaction, (c) input-focused material followed by interaction, and (d) interaction-focused material followed by input. A control group completed a pretest and posttest. In general, greatest improvement from pretest to posttest for all conditions was noted for vocabulary. Learners exposed to input and interaction in combination showed greater improvement than those in conditions with only input or only interaction. In the two grammatical areas (gender agreement and estar + location), learners who received interaction followed by input showed greatest improvement. We consider issues such as complexity and abstractness to account for the findings of differential effects on language areas.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 27, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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