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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


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Academic Paper


Title: Language development in a bimodal bilingual child with cochlear implant: A longitudinal study
Author: Pasquale Rinaldi
Institution: Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione (ISTC)
Author: Maria Cristina Caselli
Institution: Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie della Cognizione (ISTC)
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: Italian
Italian Sign Language
Abstract: To address the negative effects of deafness on spoken language acquisition, many clinicians suggest using cochlear implant (CI) and oral education and advise against sign language, even when combined with spoken language (i.e., bilingualism), believing that it may slow down spoken language development. In a deaf child with CI who was exposed at an early age to Italian Sign Language and spoken Italian, we evaluated language development and the relationship between the two languages. The number of words/signs produced by the child consistently increased with age, and the vocabulary growth rate in spoken Italian was equivalent to that of hearing peers. Before CI, the child relied almost exclusively on sign language; after CI, he gradually shifted to spoken Italian yet still used sign language when unable to retrieve words in spoken Italian. We conclude that bimodal bilingualism may scaffold the development of spoken language also in deaf children with CI.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 17, Issue 4.

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