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It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Academic Paper

Title: Bootstrapping parsers via syntactic projection across parallel texts
Author: Rebecca Hwa
Institution: University of Pittsburgh
Author: Philip Resnik
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Maryland
Author: Amy Weinberg
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Maryland
Author: Clara Cabezas
Institution: University of Maryland
Author: Okan Kolak
Institution: University of Maryland
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics
Abstract: Broad coverage, high quality parsers are available for only a handful of languages. A prerequisite for developing broad coverage parsers for more languages is the annotation of text with the desired linguistic representations (also known as "treebanking"). However, syntactic annotation is a labor intensive and time-consuming process, and it is difficult to find linguistically annotated text in sufficient quantities. In this article, we explore using parallel text to help solving the problem of creating syntactic annotation in more languages. The central idea is to annotate the English side of a parallel corpus, project the analysis to the second language, and then train a stochastic analyzer on the resulting noisy annotations. We discuss our background assumptions, describe an initial study on the "projectability" of syntactic relations, and then present two experiments in which stochastic parsers are developed with minimal human intervention via projection from English.


This article appears IN Natural Language Engineering Vol. 11, Issue 3.

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