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Revitalizing Endangered Languages

Edited by Justyna Olko & Julia Sallabank

Revitalizing Endangered Languages "This guidebook provides ideas and strategies, as well as some background, to help with the effective revitalization of endangered languages. It covers a broad scope of themes including effective planning, benefits, wellbeing, economic aspects, attitudes and ideologies."


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Academic Paper


Title: Te Reo Māori: indigenous language acquisition in the context of New Zealand English
Author: ELAINE REESE
Author: PETER KEEGAN
Author: STUART MCNAUGHTON
Author: TE KINGI
Author: POLLY CARR
Author: JOHANNA SCHMIDT
Author: JATENDER MOHAL
Author: CAMERON GRANT
Author: SUSAN MORTON
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Maori
English
Abstract: This study assessed the status of te reo Māori, the indigenous language of New Zealand, in the context of New Zealand English. From a broadly representative sample of 6327 two-year-olds (Growing Up in New Zealand), 6090 mothers (96%) reported their children understood English, and 763 mothers (12%) reported their children understood Māori. Parents completed the new MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventory short forms for te reo Māori (NZM: CDI sf) and New Zealand English (NZE: CDI sf). Mothers with higher education levels had children with larger vocabularies in both te reo Māori and NZ English. For English speakers, vocabulary advantages also existed for girls, first-borns, monolinguals, those living in areas of lower deprivation, and those whose mothers had no concerns about their speech and language. Because more than 99% of Māori speakers were bilingual, te reo Māori acquisition appears to be occurring in the context of the acquisition of New Zealand English.

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This article appears IN Journal of Child Language Vol. 45, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site .

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