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Academic Paper


Title: Exploring the Relation between the Qualitative and Quantitative Uses of the Determiner Some
Author: Patrick J Duffley
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.fl.ulaval.ca/lli/PDuffley.htm
Institution: Université Laval
Author: Pierre Larrivée
Institution: Harvard University
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics; Syntax
Subject Language: English
Abstract: This article attempts to repair the neglect of the qualitative uses of some and to suggest an explanation which could cover the full range of usage with this determiner – both quantitative and qualitative – showing how a single underlying meaning, modulated by contextual and pragmatic factors, can give rise to the wide variety of messages expressed by some in actual usage. Both the treatment of some as an existential quantifier and the scalar model which views some as evoking a less-than-expected quantity on a pragmatic scale are shown to be incapable of handling the qualitative uses of this determiner. An original analysis of some and the interaction of its meaning with the defining features of the qualitative uses is proposed, extending the discussion as well to the role of focus and the adverbial modifier quite. The crucial semantic feature of some for the explanation of its capacity to express qualitative readings is argued to be non-identification of a referent assumed to be particular. Under the appropriate conditions, this notion can give rise to qualitative denigration (implying it is not even worth the bother to identify the referent) or qualitative appreciation (implying the referent to be so outstanding that it defies identification). The explanation put forward is also shown to cover some's use as an approximator, thereby enhancing its plausibility even further.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN English Language and Linguistics Vol. 16, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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