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Summary Details


Query:   St.Lucian English and Creole
Author:  Antheia Cadette-Blasse
Submitter Email:  click here to access email
Linguistic LingField(s):   Phonology

Summary:   Regarding query: http://www.linguistlist.org/issues/16/16-2988.html#1

Recently I posted a query on linguistlinguist regarding the phonology of
St.Lucian English received very insightful information from a few
linguists. My heartfelt thanks go out to:

Jeffery ALlen
Dr.Martha Isaac
Edward Mitchell
Paul Garrett
Kansai Guy

The following were recommended for information on St.Lucian French Creole
phonology:

Lawrence Carrington (1984). St.Lucian Creole: A descriptive analysis of its
Phonology and Morpho-Syntax.

Jeffery ALlen. (1994. Sainte-Lucie: reflexification,
décréolisation,recréolisation ou adlexification? Doctoral thesis,
Département des sciences du langage et Centre de Recherche Linguistiques et
Sémiologiques . Université Lyon 2, 183 pages.

The latter also contains information regarding the phonology of St.Lucian
English. Jeffery Allen however provides more of a sociolinguistic
perspective of the St.Lucian languages in:

Jeffery Allen. (1992). Sainte-Lucie: Description sociolinguistique d'une
île antillaise. Département des sciences du langage. Université Lyon 2, 111
pages.

Equally insightful, but within the field of Anthropological Linguitics is
work by Paul Garrett:

Paul Garrett. (2003). An English Creole that isn't: On the sociohistorical
origins and linguistic classification of the vernacular English St.Lucia.
In Michael Aceto & Jeffery Williams (Eds.), Contact Englishes of the Caribbean.

Paul Garrett. (2000). ''High Kwéyòl'': The emergence of a formal Creole
register in St.Lucia.

The work of David Frank, as well as John Amastae and Pauline Christie was
also recommended. (Amastae and Christie have worked extensively on Domincan
Creole).

Once again, many thanks to all those who responded to my query.

Antheia Cadette-Blasse
Étudiante (Maîtrise)
Université Laval
Québec

LL Issue: 16.3257
Date Posted: 11-Nov-2005


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