Featured Linguist!

Jost Gippert: Our Featured Linguist!

"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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Program Information



Program Name:

Graduate School Empirical and Applied Linguistics - Doctoral Program
Alternate Name: Promotionskolleg Empirische und Angewandte Sprachwissenschaft- Promotionsstudium
Program Homepage: http://www.uni-muenster.de/Promotionskolleg-Sprachwissenschaft/index.html
Institution: Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster
Address: Aegidiistraße 5
City: Münster
Zip/Postal Code: 48143
Country: Germany
Contact Person: Verena Wecker
Email:

click here to access email

Phone: +49 (251) 83-26121
Fax: +49 (251) 83-29878
Linguistic Subfield(s): Applied Linguistics
Other Program Specialties: Empirical Linguistics
Program Size: Small (1-10 students)
Program Description: Start: Winter or Summer semester

Application deadline: May 30 for the Winter Semester, November 30 for the Summer Semester

Duration: 6 semesters, 12 semesters part-time
Languages of instruction: German and English

Degree: Dr. phil.

Tuition fees: none

The Graduate School Empirical and Applied Linguistics offers promising young researchers an interdisciplinary PhD. program with a focus on linguistics. Professors from a broad range of subjects are participating, thus ensuring multidisciplinary collaboration.

The doctoral students in the PhD program of Empirical and Applied Linguistics can write their dissertation on any linguistic subject area, including applied linguistics, second language acquisition and a linguistic topic within the framework of a specific philology. The student can choose whether to focus on a more theoretical or a more applied topic, provided that the dissertation has a solid empirical basis.

The goal of the PhD program is to ensure that the doctoral student is proficient in various methods of linguistic data collection and analysis and can therefore use these methods in a critical and reflected way.

All doctoral students will receive individual supervision from 2 faculty members. In order to enable a well supervised and efficiently completed PhD program, a written supervision agreement, detailing the student's goals and a time-frame, will be drawn up before the doctoral student takes up her or his studies.

All doctoral students will meet on a regular basis in an informal type of colloquium called Werkstatt in order to discuss methodological and theoretical issues. They also have to attend the more formal Colloquium of the Doctoral Students where they have to report on progress in their dissertation research and preparation on three different occasions:

1.) Proposal Defense - usually at the end of the first semester.
2.) Mid Term Review - usually towards the end of the third semester.
3.) Thesis Defense - at the end of the 5th semester.

In addition to these obligatory courses, the program comprises elements that can be tailored to meet each student's individual preferences and needs:
* An individually planned obligatory study program covering 10 ECTS-points
* An elective course from the element Teaching, Lecturing, Publishing, covering at least 8 ECTS-points.
* An elective course from the element Organization of Scientific Activities and Supplementary Studies, covering at least 12 ECTS-points.

Studying at the Graduate School thus involves the constant exchange of ideas with the other doctoral students and exposure to the everyday workings of scientific inquiry. Because of its flexibility, the program can accommodate each student's individual interests and plans for the future.

The Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster does not consist of a single campus, but instead has its departments spread all over town, making the university an integral part of the city. Because of the high percentage of students (15%) living and studying in Münster, they have strongly influenced each other. In 2004, Münster won the LivCom-Award and was named The World's Most Livable City. Last but not least, Münster is famous for the fact that the bicycles are the main mode of transport. This greatly adds to its attractiveness for students.
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